David Nobles, a truck driver in Central Texas, was getting his life in order. He had just gotten married, bought a new truck, and was working out a loan to build a new home.

Then the coronavirus hit, forcing everything from conferences to concerts to be canceled. Public health experts have deemed these cancellations necessary to squash the spread of coronavirus, but it’s a major threat to service-oriented industries and the people who work for them. Nobles was one of those people and suddenly lost his job transporting band and stage equipment.

“In an overnight frenzy, the whole touring industry came to a halt,” Nobles told Business Insider. “Singers, comedians, sports, everything that involved touring. Our shows have been canceled and or postponed until at least the end of the summer.”

That means the supplier he worked for had to let the entire transportation team go.

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“Now I’m left picking up the pieces, trying to keep my new wife happy and trusting in me that I’ll find another job,” Nobles said.

Nobles is one of many in the industry experiencing the same struggles. Across the board, trucking executives are sounding the alarm on how coronavirus will affect their business, according to the Bank of American Truck Shipper Survey released Friday.